Elephants endure months of physical abuse as babies in order to learn to “paint.” Please don’t patronize these places or buy the paintings. It just perpetuates the abuse.

People see the painting as evidence that elephants are smart. And indeed they  are. But they have their own natural intelligence and ways of being. Trying to make them more like us and calling that “smart” is self centered and abusive. For more info, click the link below.
 (via elephant painting)

Elephants endure months of physical abuse as babies in order to learn to “paint.” Please don’t patronize these places or buy the paintings. It just perpetuates the abuse.

People see the painting as evidence that elephants are smart. And indeed they are. But they have their own natural intelligence and ways of being. Trying to make them more like us and calling that “smart” is self centered and abusive. For more info, click the link below.
(via elephant painting)

bethrevis

The First and Last Sentences of The Chronicles of Narnia series

Awesome. Except the order is wrong. The estate reordered the books after Lewis died to make them chronological, but he wrote them in this order, and I’m old school. I think they should be read in the order they were written. Which is:

The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe (clearly written to be our introduction to Narnia in every possible way)

Prince Caspian

Voyage of the Dawn Treader

The Silver Chair

A Horse and His Boy

The Magician’s Nephew (so much more meaningful after you’ve gotten to know Narnia)

The Last Battle.

But, the truth of the truth is that - no matter what order you read them in, or how, they are wonderful. And I love this post.

hollyblack
thenovl:

You know when you read something and you have to stop every other page because you want to read it out loud to the person sitting next to you?
This is like that. Only you’re the person sitting next to us and we can’t read it out loud because this book doesn’t come out until January!
Grrr. C’est la vie.
Holly Black’s The Darkest Part of the Forest marks her triumphant return to her faerie roots, and will be out January 13, 2015. Until then here’s a taste:

Children can have a cruel, absolute sense of justice. Children can kill a monster and feel quite proud of themselves. A girl can look at her brother and believe they’re destined to be a knight and a bard who battle evil. She can believe she’s found the thing she’s been made for.
Hazel lives with her brother, Ben, in the strange town of Fairfold where humans and fae exist side by side. The faeries’ seemingly harmless magic attracts tourists, but Hazel knows how dangerous they can be, and she knows how to stop them. Or she did, once.
At the center of it all, there is a glass coffin in the woods. It rests right on the ground and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives. Hazel and Ben were both in love with him as children. The boy has slept there for generations, never waking.
Until one day, he does…
As the world turns upside down, Hazel tries to remember her years pretending to be a knight. But swept up in new love, shifting loyalties, and the fresh sting of betrayal, will it be enough?

And this cover! Beautiful, right?

thenovl:

You know when you read something and you have to stop every other page because you want to read it out loud to the person sitting next to you?

This is like that. Only you’re the person sitting next to us and we can’t read it out loud because this book doesn’t come out until January!

Grrr. C’est la vie.

Holly Black’s The Darkest Part of the Forest marks her triumphant return to her faerie roots, and will be out January 13, 2015. Until then here’s a taste:

Children can have a cruel, absolute sense of justice. Children can kill a monster and feel quite proud of themselves. A girl can look at her brother and believe they’re destined to be a knight and a bard who battle evil. She can believe she’s found the thing she’s been made for.

Hazel lives with her brother, Ben, in the strange town of Fairfold where humans and fae exist side by side. The faeries’ seemingly harmless magic attracts tourists, but Hazel knows how dangerous they can be, and she knows how to stop them. Or she did, once.

At the center of it all, there is a glass coffin in the woods. It rests right on the ground and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives. Hazel and Ben were both in love with him as children. The boy has slept there for generations, never waking.

Until one day, he does…

As the world turns upside down, Hazel tries to remember her years pretending to be a knight. But swept up in new love, shifting loyalties, and the fresh sting of betrayal, will it be enough?

And this cover! Beautiful, right?

yaseriesinsiders
yaseriesinsiders:

What We’re Reading - April Edition
Jennifer L. Armentrout
I’m finally getting to read INTO THE STILL BLUE by Veronica Rossi. Totally in love with the series and it’s been so hard not to flip to the end to see how it all goes down. I’m a bad reader like that.
 
Nina Berry
LIFE AFTER LIFE by Kate Atkinson is a fascinating novel about the power of choice and chance. Ursula Todd is born, lives, dies, then is born again to make slightly different choices, so that her life takes many different paths. Along the way we see how entire countries - like England during the Blitz and Germany under Hitler - also made choices that lead them down the path of history. As a writer, I’m really enjoying seeing how Kate Atkinson deals with such an intricate and tricky subject.
 
Anne Blankman 
Right now I’m reading INTO THE STILL BLUE by Veronica Rossi. Gorgeous writing, a fascinating setting, with heart-pounding action and a swoon worthy romance—what more could you want? 
 
Martina Boone 
I am reading DREAMS OF GODS AND MONSTERS, the final book of Laini Taylor’s gorgeous DAUGHTER OF SMOKE AND BONE trilogy about the forbidden love between a terrible seraphim and a beautiful monster in the last days of the war between their races. My thoughts so far? DoGaM is a Tootsie Pop. I’m trying to savor it a few pages at a time—I don’t want to come to the last exquisitely-crafted word of a series that has become my favorite among favorites. (Also I’m on deadline for the sequel to COMPULSION.) But my self-control keeps breaking. As always, Laini’s prose, mythology, characters, and story are hauntingly brain-bending and so, so perfect.
 
Tracy Clark 
I consider myself a character-driven writer. There, I said it. Plot is a vital road map to get from A to B, but if you don’t care about the characters, then do you really want to go on a trip with them? The book I just finished reading is a beautiful love story at its core, and a richly colorful rendering of two very interesting, very unforgettable characters.
Even though my debut novel is a YA paranormal, I am a sucker for contemporary. There’s been a lot of hype lately about Rainbow Rowell’s novel, ELEANOR & PARK. It’s won numerous awards, most recently the 2014 Michael L. Printz Honor Book for Excellence in Young Adult Literature. I had to read it and I’m so glad I did!
Set in 1986 (which is awesome for the music references alone) it just happens to be set in the exact year when I was the age of Eleanor and Park. I related wholly to the all-consuming pull of love and the sting of not fitting in. The subtle details not only convince you that this is someone who can expertly craft a teen story, but who vividly recalls every bewildering, maddening, frustrating, unfair, and wildly beautiful moment of being a teen. It’s a great read.
 
S. E. Green 
Colleen Hoover is my new favorite author. Her latest, MAYBE SOMEDAY, is perfect. It’ll make you laugh, cry, and re-think the lines long after you turn the page. Sydney and Ridge are so believable, not only together, but in their separate lives, too. The way Colleen weaves her words to illustrate emotion is absolutely amazing. If you haven’t read a Hoover novel, start with this one and work your way through her list. You won’t be disappointed! 
 
Kimberley Griffiths Little 
I’m reading IN THE SHADOW OF BLACKBIRDS by Cat Winters. I *love* historical fiction and yet I’ve read so many set during WWI or during the 1918 flu era that I wasn’t sure what new things this book could bring to it, but OHMYGOSH, the story kept me flipping the pages and I didn’t get my own writing done one day because I couldn’t stand to wait any longer to see how all the pieces were going to come together so I read the last 200 pages all in one sitting. Spooky. Sinister. Chilling.  
Add a touch of spiritualism, seances, trick photography, and an era where so many people were dying from the war and the Spanish Influenza epidemic, their families were desperate to know that their loved ones were okay on the “other side”. The little historical details of cars and clothing and downtown San Diego and food was superbly done, too. Really loved this book! 
 
 

yaseriesinsiders:

What We’re Reading - April Edition

Jennifer L. Armentrout

I’m finally getting to read INTO THE STILL BLUE by Veronica Rossi. Totally in love with the series and it’s been so hard not to flip to the end to see how it all goes down. I’m a bad reader like that.

 

Nina Berry

LIFE AFTER LIFE by Kate Atkinson is a fascinating novel about the power of choice and chance. Ursula Todd is born, lives, dies, then is born again to make slightly different choices, so that her life takes many different paths. Along the way we see how entire countries - like England during the Blitz and Germany under Hitler - also made choices that lead them down the path of history. As a writer, I’m really enjoying seeing how Kate Atkinson deals with such an intricate and tricky subject.

 

Anne Blankman 

Right now I’m reading INTO THE STILL BLUE by Veronica Rossi. Gorgeous writing, a fascinating setting, with heart-pounding action and a swoon worthy romance—what more could you want? 

 

Martina Boone 

I am reading DREAMS OF GODS AND MONSTERS, the final book of Laini Taylor’s gorgeous DAUGHTER OF SMOKE AND BONE trilogy about the forbidden love between a terrible seraphim and a beautiful monster in the last days of the war between their races. My thoughts so far? DoGaM is a Tootsie Pop. I’m trying to savor it a few pages at a time—I don’t want to come to the last exquisitely-crafted word of a series that has become my favorite among favorites. (Also I’m on deadline for the sequel to COMPULSION.) But my self-control keeps breaking. As always, Laini’s prose, mythology, characters, and story are hauntingly brain-bending and so, so perfect.

 

Tracy Clark 

I consider myself a character-driven writer. There, I said it. Plot is a vital road map to get from A to B, but if you don’t care about the characters, then do you really want to go on a trip with them? The book I just finished reading is a beautiful love story at its core, and a richly colorful rendering of two very interesting, very unforgettable characters.

Even though my debut novel is a YA paranormal, I am a sucker for contemporary. There’s been a lot of hype lately about Rainbow Rowell’s novel, ELEANOR & PARK. It’s won numerous awards, most recently the 2014 Michael L. Printz Honor Book for Excellence in Young Adult Literature. I had to read it and I’m so glad I did!

Set in 1986 (which is awesome for the music references alone) it just happens to be set in the exact year when I was the age of Eleanor and Park. I related wholly to the all-consuming pull of love and the sting of not fitting in. The subtle details not only convince you that this is someone who can expertly craft a teen story, but who vividly recalls every bewildering, maddening, frustrating, unfair, and wildly beautiful moment of being a teen. It’s a great read.

 

S. E. Green 

Colleen Hoover is my new favorite author. Her latest, MAYBE SOMEDAY, is perfect. It’ll make you laugh, cry, and re-think the lines long after you turn the page. Sydney and Ridge are so believable, not only together, but in their separate lives, too. The way Colleen weaves her words to illustrate emotion is absolutely amazing. If you haven’t read a Hoover novel, start with this one and work your way through her list. You won’t be disappointed! 

 

Kimberley Griffiths Little 

I’m reading IN THE SHADOW OF BLACKBIRDS by Cat Winters. I *love* historical fiction and yet I’ve read so many set during WWI or during the 1918 flu era that I wasn’t sure what new things this book could bring to it, but OHMYGOSH, the story kept me flipping the pages and I didn’t get my own writing done one day because I couldn’t stand to wait any longer to see how all the pieces were going to come together so I read the last 200 pages all in one sitting. Spooky. Sinister. Chilling.  

Add a touch of spiritualism, seances, trick photography, and an era where so many people were dying from the war and the Spanish Influenza epidemic, their families were desperate to know that their loved ones were okay on the “other side”. The little historical details of cars and clothing and downtown San Diego and food was superbly done, too. Really loved this book! 

 

 

martinaboone
martinaboone:

I’m celebrating two million page views and a lot of other milestones with a ginormous book party at AdventuresInYAPublishing.com! Win twenty prize packs including thirty-eight different books or series, including wonderful books by Jennifer L. Armentrout, Holly Black, Anne Blankman, Libba Bray, Sarah Rees Brennan, Rae Carson, Kresley Cole, Leah Cypess, Kimberly Derting, Lisa Gail Green, S.E. Green, Wendy Higgins, Rosamund Hodge, Clara Kensie, Kimberley Griffiths Little, Marie Rutkoski, Maggie Stiefvater, Laini Taylor, Kat Zhang and more!

martinaboone:

I’m celebrating two million page views and a lot of other milestones with a ginormous book party at AdventuresInYAPublishing.com! Win twenty prize packs including thirty-eight different books or series, including wonderful books by Jennifer L. Armentrout, Holly Black, Anne Blankman, Libba Bray, Sarah Rees Brennan, Rae Carson, Kresley Cole, Leah Cypess, Kimberly Derting, Lisa Gail Green, S.E. Green, Wendy Higgins, Rosamund Hodge, Clara Kensie, Kimberley Griffiths Little, Marie Rutkoski, Maggie Stiefvater, Laini Taylor, Kat Zhang and more!

ancientpeoples
ancientpeoples:

Faience hippopotamus 
Hippopotami were feared by the Egyptians because these animals are very destructive and dangerous. By making these statues the Egyptian hoped to controle those dangers and keep them at bay. The lotusflowers painted on the animals are symbols of fertility and the marshes where hippo’s mostly stayed. The goddess Taweret is a pregnant hippo and was worshipped by pregnant women to protect their unborn child. 
Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, 12th dynasty, 1960 - 1878 BC. 
Found in middle Egypt, Meir, Tomb of Senbi II
Source: Metropolitan Museum

One of my favorite works of art of all time. Here’s the front angle:

ancientpeoples:

Faience hippopotamus 

Hippopotami were feared by the Egyptians because these animals are very destructive and dangerous. By making these statues the Egyptian hoped to controle those dangers and keep them at bay. The lotusflowers painted on the animals are symbols of fertility and the marshes where hippo’s mostly stayed. The goddess Taweret is a pregnant hippo and was worshipped by pregnant women to protect their unborn child. 

Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, 12th dynasty, 1960 - 1878 BC. 

Found in middle Egypt, Meir, Tomb of Senbi II

Source: Metropolitan Museum

One of my favorite works of art of all time. Here’s the front angle: